Category Archives: Politics and Business

Bring Back Manufacturing Jobs

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com, Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation, Adjunct Professor(ret.), Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

President Trump promised that he will bring back manufacturing jobs that in recent years moved to other more “competitive” countries. That is a great objective for our employment and economic expansion.

I wish him success.

In late 2012 I wrote a book titled “Th Technology Imperative: What Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Really Means in the 21st Century”

Here are issues addressed in my book. Certain brief summaries have been posted and the others will be posted.  The linkages are shown just under the headings.

  1. Some Things Are Not Reversible  http://businessthinker.com/some-things-are-not-reversible/
  2. To Solve a Problem, First Define It
    http://businessthinker.com/to-solve-a-problem-first-define-it/
  3. Forget planned obsolescence; it will happen, planned or not
    http://businessthinker.com/forget-planned-obsolescence-it-will-happen-planned-or-not/
  4. The other elephant in the room (and every room in the whole world)
  5. Why progress always ‘puts some people out of work’
  6. Manufacturing, despite all that, remains crucial to our economy
    http://businessthinker.com/manufacturing-despite-all-that-remains-crucial-to-our-economy/
  7. Education isn’t everything, but it’s close
  8. So can we ‘define the problem’ now?
  9. The problem defined
  10. Avoiding dystopia
  11. In addition to bringing back jobs here is a suggested solution for expanding our economy and maintaining improving employment:
    http://businessthinker.com/a-new-economic-growth-corporation-the-egc/

Reference:

“The Technology Imperative: What Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Really Means in the 21st Century”, John Psarouthakis, Gavdos Press, October 2012.

Contact via email:   drjohnps@hotmail.com



1 in 3 Companies Constrained by Corruption

jim-kimBy Dr. JimYong KimM.D., Ph.D. is the President of the World Bank Group. Soon after he became president in July 2012, the organization established two goals: ending extreme poverty by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity for the bottom 40 percent of the population in developing countries. Kim’s career has been focused on health, education, and delivering services to the poor.

Approximately one in three companies around the world identify corruption as a major constraint to operating their business. We can and must do much more to combat corruption. It poses an enormous obstacle to the global goal of ending extreme poverty, denying resources to the poor and undermining the delivery of services to the vulnerable. 

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Greater Inequality Not Due To New Technology And Free Trade

scoccoBy Sandro Scocco is Chief Economist at the Stockholm-based think tank Arena Idé and has a background as the Chief Economist of the governmental research institute ITPS. He is also a former Director at the Labour Market Board and served during the 1990s as an adviser to several Swedish social democratic ministers.

From the Social Europe Journal, December 9, 2016

A popular narrative today is that low-income groups in the western world have fallen behind owing to jobs lost to new machines and to low-paid jobs overseas. Political populists like Trump or Le Pen have happily exploited this frustration with nostalgic, nationalistic and anti-free trade messages. A new study shows that this narrative has little support in historical trends.

Certainly, large groups have fallen behind in recent decades. But this is true not only of low-income groups but also of large parts of the middle class in many countries. Take, for example, those with higher education in the US; their real incomes have stagnated in the past 15 years. In the whole of the industrialised world median wage growth has fallen markedly behind GDP growth. By contrast, the top 1 percent have increased their income much faster than the rise in GDP and, in some countries, including the US and Sweden, they have more than doubled their income share.

So, there is a clear breeding ground for anger and frustration among broad groups, and not just among low-income earners, but is it really related to technology and trade?

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