Assetization of Human Capital

By Martin Ejenobor. Partner at Revele. He  is a Business Adviser, Innovation Strategist, Speaker, Trainer, Thinker and Entrepreneur with over 15- years multifaceted experience proffering solutions “to” various industries including FMCG, Luxury Goods, Human Resource Development and Sports.

“This article addresses the concept of people as capital that companies can buy and sell. Is this just a dream or it’s a trend?
How soon will it happen if at all”

Here are some excerpts from this article posted in LinkedIn recently. Click on the link at the end of this sharing.

“Let’s start by defining the word ‘asset’ then we will describe it in context for clarity”.

“The definition of the word asset usually comes close to the ability of a (tangible or intangible) things to be monetized. If it cannot be sold, it is has no value for the which it may be traded then it is not an asset”.

“Human Capital is a Knowledge Based Asset (KBA) and therefore yields as such. So back to our talk of assetization, it is clear that an asset is anything an entity can trade for money (Knowledge, property -tangible or intangible, stocks, bonds, etc) but has any organization traded its humans (staff) as assets? Your guess is as good as mine- none!”

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Robots v experts: are any human professions safe from automation?

Editor’s note: Given the intense discussion on the employment issues generated by the Robotics technology, I found this book presentation published by British www.theguardian.com very relevant and I am refering to it here.

By

Richard Susskind OBE is an author, speaker, and independent adviser to international professional firms and national governments. He is president of the Society for Computers and law IT adviser to the lord chief justice. Tomorrow’s Lawyers is his eighth book,

and

Daniel Susskind is an economist, lecturer at Balliol College, Oxford, and co-author with Richard Susskind of The Future of the Professions

The main themes of our book, The Future of the Professions, can be put simply: machines are becoming increasingly capable and so are taking on more and more tasks.

Many of these tasks were once the exclusive preserve of human professionals such as doctors, lawyers and accountants. While new tasks will certainly emerge in years to come, it is probable that machines will, over time, take on many of these as well. In the 2020s, we say, this will not mean unemployment, but rather a need for widespread retraining and redeployment. In the long run though, we find it hard to avoid the conclusion that there will be a steady decline in the need for traditional professional workers.

During the year after the book’s hardback publication in October 2015, we tested this line of argument on audiences of professionals in more than 20 countries, speaking to around 15,000 people at over 100 events. The response, frankly, was mixed. Our work seems to polarise people into those who agree zealously with our thesis, and those who reject it unreservedly. Both sides argue their views passionately.

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WHO BUYS COMPANIES AND WHY

If you are buying a business for the first time, you will find that buying a business is a unique experience that requires extensive knowledge and skills in a broad spectrum of areas–legal, accounting, banking, financing, understanding of government regulations, especially in areas of environment, safety and employee relations.  You must learn how to obtain and screen leads, how to evaluate and price prospective companies, and how to conduct due diligence. But even highly experienced entrepreneurs who have completed dozens of deals still rely upon professional expertise for certain phases of the process.  Thus expect that even after you learn more about the deal-making process, you will still need to hire consultants to assist you in making a successful purchase.

Buying a company is very demanding because it is an intellectual, pragmatic and emotional process, all in one. It is an intellectual process because to be successful you have to think it out.  It is a pragmatic process because you have to be realistic about the company you are looking to buy, whether it is worth buying, what its real value is, and what it should be priced at. And buying a company, finally, is an emotional process.  Throughout negotiations, beginning with first contact with the seller and continuing through to the closing of the sale, you experience tremendous highs and lows. You must be able to handle both extremes of emotion. You must handle the highs, so as not to reveal your enthusiasm to the seller, and after the lows, to be able to come back and find a solution to the problem that might otherwise kill the deal.  The emotional component holds true even after many deals but you do learn to control those emotions with practice.

Reasons for Buying Your Own Business

Some of the reasons for buying your own business are similar to those of any entrepreneur: to control your own destiny; the personal challenge, making money, the satisfaction of building and running something on your own. Continue reading WHO BUYS COMPANIES AND WHY

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