The (other) deleveraging: What economists need to know about the modern money creation process

Print pagePDF pageEmail page

Manmohan Singh is a Senior Economist at the IMF in Washington DC.  He continues to write extensively on topical issues including  deleveraging in financial markets, rehypothecation of collateral, and counterparty risk in OTC derivatives. He was the first to identify the role cheapest-to-deliver bonds as a proxy for recovery value in CDS instruments.

Peter Stella is Director of Stellar Consulting LLC providing macroeconomic policy advice and research to central banks, governments, and private clients in Asia, Europe, the United States and Latin America.

This article is republished from and in accordance with the policy ofVoxEU.org

The world of credit creation has shifted over recent years. This column argues this shift is more profound than is commonly understood. It describes the private credit creation process, explains how the ‘money multiplier’ depends upon inter-bank trust, and discusses the implications for monetary policy.

One of the financial system’s chief roles is to provide credit for worthy investments. Some very deep changes are happening to this system – changes that surprisingly few people are aware of. This column presents a quick sketch of the modern credit creation and then discusses the deep changes are that are affecting it – what we call the ‘other deleveraging’.

Modern credit creation without central bank reserves

In the simple textbook view, savers deposit their money with banks and banks make loans to investors (Mankiw 2010). The textbook view, however, is no longer a sufficient description of the credit creation process. A great deal of credit is created through so-called ‘collateral chains’.

We start from two principles: credit creation is money creation, and short-term credit is generally extended by private agents against collateral. Money creation and collateral are thus joined at the hip, so to speak. In the traditional money creation process, collateral consists of central bank reserves; in the modern private money creation process, collateral is in the eye of the beholder. Here is an example.

A Hong Kong hedge fund may get financing from UBS secured by collateral pledged to the UBS bank’s UK affiliate – say, Indonesian bonds. Naturally, there will be a haircut on the pledged collateral (i.e. each borrower, the hedge fund in this example, will have to pledge more than $1 of collateral for each $1 of credit).

These bonds are ‘pledged collateral’ as far as UBS is concerned and under modern legal practices, they can be ‘re-used’. This is the part that may strike non-specialists as novel; collateral that backs one loan can in turn be used as collateral against further loans, so the same underlying asset ends up as securing loans worth multiples of its value. Of course the re-pledging cannot go on forever as haircuts progressively reduce the credit-raising potential of the underlying asset, but ultimately, several lenders are counting on the underlying assets as backup in case things go wrong.

To take an example of re-pledging, there may be demand for the Indonesia bonds from a pension fund in Chile. As since these credit-for-collateral deals are intermediated by the large global banks, the demand and supply can meet only if UBS trusts the Chilean pension fund’s global bank, say Santander as a reliable counterparty till the tenor of the onward pledge.

Plainly this re-use of pledged collateral creates credit in a way that is analogous to the traditional money-creation process, i.e. the lending-deposit-relending process based on central bank reserves. Specifically in this analogy, the Indonesian bonds are like high-powered money, the haircut is like the reserve ratio, and the number of re-pledgings (the ‘length’ of the collateral chain) is like the money multiplier.

To get an idea on magnitudes, at the end of 2007 the world’s large banks received about $10 trillion in pledged collateral; since this is pledged for credit, the volume of pledged assets is a good measure of the private credit creation. For the same period, the primary source collateral (from hedge funds and custodians on behalf of their clients) that was intermediated by the same banks was about $3.4 trillion. So the ratio (or re-use rate of collateral) was around 3 times as of end-2007. For comparison to the $10 trillion figure, the US M2 was about $7 trillion in 2007, so this credit-creation-via-collateral-chains is a major source of credit in today’s financial system. Figure 1 shows the amounts for big banks in the US and Europe.

To read the entire article please click or copy and paste the link: http://bit.ly/P8Pfrg

The Authors

Manmohan Singh is a Senior Economist at the IMF in Washington DC.  He continues to write extensively on topical issues including  deleveraging in financial markets, rehypothecation of collateral, and counterparty risk in OTC derivatives. He was the first to identify the role cheapest-to-deliver bonds as a proxy for recovery value in CDS instruments. Manmohan has led workshops for the IMF on strategic asset allocation and regulatory proposals to official sector policy makers. His articles have regularly appeared in Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Euromoney, RISK, Journal of Investment Management, etc. His work experience covers several countries including U.K., U.S., Chile, India, Japan,Hungary, Poland,the Gulf countries and more recently peripheral Europe.

He holds a Ph.d. in Economics and a MBA from Univ. Illinois (Urbana-Champaign). He received his B.S. (magna cum laude) from Allegheny College, Pennsylvania. He was previously with ABN Amro Bank’s emerging market syndicate team (Amsterdam/London).

Peter Stella is former head of the Central Banking and Monetary and Foreign Exchange Operations Divisions at the International Monetary Fund. Currently Director of Stellar Consulting LLC providing macroeconomic policy advice and research to central banks, governments, and private clients in Asia, Europe, the United States and Latin America.

 

One thought on “The (other) deleveraging: What economists need to know about the modern money creation process”

  1. Very useful explanation and clearly written. Obviously, It raises questions about the need for accountability and oversight. But that is a different topic. Well done.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *