Tag Archives: Trump

Dumbed-Down Politics has Forced us on a Path that We Can Lose the Economic War!


Dr. John Psarouthakis
, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com, Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation, Adjunct Professor(ret.), Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

With ideological shouters exhorting the citizenry toward one precipice on the left and another on the right, a polarized America seems poised for a rocky demise, probably in answer to a Last Days tweet. Worse, this critical mass appears sufficient to drag us all down. The debt bomb and the entitlement bomb, to say nothing of other bombs, wait for no man. Depending which true-believer cliff one leans toward, America is descending into either a communal hell of withering fortune and lost freedoms, or an eternal blue flame of capitalist greed. If you find the shouters outrageously out of touch (not in their Doomsday forecasts, but in their self-fulfilling gridlock), you obviously are not alone. So where can a reader turn to find a compelling centrist message for our generation, or even a little book of bull’s-eye polemic? Where is Frank Capra when you need him, someone who can make us believe in the American Dream even as the 21st Century limps on.

Continue reading Dumbed-Down Politics has Forced us on a Path that We Can Lose the Economic War!

Bring Back Manufacturing Jobs

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com, Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation, Adjunct Professor(ret.), Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

President Trump promised that he will bring back manufacturing jobs that in recent years moved to other more “competitive” countries. That is a great objective for our employment and economic expansion.

I wish him success.

In late 2012 I wrote a book titled “Th Technology Imperative: What Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Really Means in the 21st Century”

Here are issues addressed in my book. Certain brief summaries have been posted and the others will be posted.  The linkages are shown just under the headings.

  1. Some Things Are Not Reversible  http://businessthinker.com/some-things-are-not-reversible/
  2. To Solve a Problem, First Define It
    http://businessthinker.com/to-solve-a-problem-first-define-it/
  3. Forget planned obsolescence; it will happen, planned or not
    http://businessthinker.com/forget-planned-obsolescence-it-will-happen-planned-or-not/
  4. The other elephant in the room (and every room in the whole world)
  5. Why progress always ‘puts some people out of work’
  6. Manufacturing, despite all that, remains crucial to our economy
    http://businessthinker.com/manufacturing-despite-all-that-remains-crucial-to-our-economy/
  7. Education isn’t everything, but it’s close
  8. So can we ‘define the problem’ now?
  9. The problem defined
  10. Avoiding dystopia
  11. In addition to bringing back jobs here is a suggested solution for expanding our economy and maintaining improving employment:
    http://businessthinker.com/a-new-economic-growth-corporation-the-egc/

Reference:

“The Technology Imperative: What Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Really Means in the 21st Century”, John Psarouthakis, Gavdos Press, October 2012.

Contact via email:   drjohnps@hotmail.com

How the Markets Responded to Trump

Why They Stayed Calm and Carried On

sumner_scott_600x900By SCOTT SUMNER who is Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and Professor of Economics at Bentley University. Follow him at the TheMoneyIllusion.com.

This article was published in Foreign Affairs on November 13, 2016.
To read the entire article please go to: http://fam.ag/2fSMsCE

World financial markets have had an unusual reaction to the unexpected U.S. presidential election victory of Donald Trump: they remained relatively calm and, some might say, even responded positively. Unlike the British pound after the Brexit vote, which tumbled rapidly shortly after, the U.S. dollar, after Trump’s election, actually strengthened modestly against foreign currencies such as the yen, the euro, and the yuan. Interest rates in the U.S. treasury bond market have increased, in both nominal and real terms. Inflation is also expected to increase modestly.

The reaction of global equity markets was perhaps the most surprising of all. U.S. stock futures fell as much as five percent on Tuesday evening, as it became apparent that Trump had all but secured a victory. The behavior was consistent with the pre-election pattern. Whenever polls showed an increased chance of a Trump win, stocks tended to dip (as they did following reports that FBI Director James Comey would be reopening an investigation into Secretary Hillary Clinton’s emails). But a few hours after Tuesday’s decline, stocks beat expectations and crept back up. By the end of the next trading day, the market was above pre-election levels.

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