Tag Archives: politicians

Don’t blame globalisation for poverty

Liam Fox is secretary of state for Defence, UK
The Guardian Newspaper, an Opinion

Two hundred and forty years ago, Adam Smith published one of the most important texts ever written. The Wealth of Nations set out his vision of free trade as a pathway to opportunity and prosperity for all; and that in a true open global economy no one need lose out – we all could benefit.

Globalization needs to be championed more vigorously

Yesterday I was in Manchester speaking about why I believe his principles are as much alive and relevant today as they were in the 18th century – despite vastly different trading environments.

We stand on the verge of an unprecedented ability to liberate global trade for the benefit of our whole planet with technological advances, such as the internet and e-commerce, dissolving the barriers of time and distance. And because of the brave and historic decision of the British people to leave the European Union, I believe the UK is in a prime position to become a world leader in free trade.

Globalization represents an acceleration of the trend in which the world has become increasingly compressed, economically, culturally and politically. However, it is becoming increasingly misunderstood and its benefits not championed vigorously enough. While the increased economic activity that globalization has generated has been broadly welcomed by business, politicians have often worried about how the dissolving concepts of sovereignty will affect their ability to influence events, and many have worried about the effects on the world’s most vulnerable people.

For the entire article please click on:  

theguardian.com/…/globalisation-poverty-corruption-free-trade-liam-fox

 

JOBS! JOBS! JOBS!

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com, Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and  Founder and former CEO, JPIndusries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation

If the 20th Century was the American Century, why does the 21st Century seem so daunting for America?  If we are still the globe’s leading manufacturer (and we are), why does globalization terrify us?  If the entire world sends its best and brightest to American graduate schools, why does our education system need reform?  Why is the most affluent nation mired in a stagnant economy?  Why do politicians of every stripe find maximum traction with empty chants of: “Jobs! Jobs! Jobs!”?

In this small but I hope meaningful book that I recently wrote I insist we must define our problems before seeking solutions.  I demonstrate, in as clear and enjoyable prose my editor and I can write, that a single problem (and opportunity) underlies all the above questions.

Just as our 19th Century farmer nation endured social upheaval but prospered in a massive shift to an urban and manufacturing 20th Century, we face a new upheaval today.  Both enormous transitions stem from the same all-powerful, irreversible force—technological progress.

This time around, I show, the great danger is that populist political rhetoric will strangle the free-market generator of wealth for all Americans, leaving us with a failed economy and a failed nation.  The American capitalist economic engine needs repair, now.  It must find new ways of sharing the wealth it creates—as it did via job creation in the 20th Century—or the politicians will ensure that the prevailing gloom will be warranted.

That challenge is THE TECHNOLOGY IMPERATIVE.

For the book: “The Technology Imperative: What Jobs, Jobs, Jobs, Really Means in the 21st Century”, published by Gavdos Press, September 2012, please go to gavdospress.com