Tag Archives: inequality

Robot revolution: rise of ‘thinking’ machines could exacerbate inequality

Heather Stewart, Joint Political Editor of the Guardian (British Newspaper)

Global economy will be transformed over next 20 years at risk of growing inequality, say analysts

A line of human-shaped robots on display at an industry fair.
Robots made by Shaanxi Jiuli Robot Manufacturing Co on display at an industry fair in Shanghai in November. Photograph: Imaginechina/Corbis

A “robot revolution” will transform the global economy over the next 20 years, cutting the costs of doing business but exacerbating social inequality, as machines take over everything from caring for the elderly to flipping burgers, according to a new study.

As well as robots performing manual jobs, such as hovering the living room or assembling machine parts, the development of artificial intelligence means computers are increasingly able to “think”, performing analytical tasks once seen as requiring human judgment.

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Globalisation and higher education: Different degrees of success. (Offshoring, inequality, and the value of college degrees)

 This article ir republished from and in accordance with the policy of  “VoxEU.org

Dr. David Hummels
Professor of Economics at Purdue University

 

 

Dr.Rasmus Jørgensen
Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Yale University’s Department of Economics

 

 

 

Dr.Jakob R. Munch
Asian Dynamics Initiative Professor of International Economics in the Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen

 

 


Dr.Chong Xiang

Associate Professor of Economics, and Director of Graduate Studies, at Economics Department, Purdue University

 

 

With stagnating wages and lingering unemployment, income inequality is back in the headlines. Is globalisation to blame for this inequality? Is more education a solution? This column argues that focusing on university education misses important effects. It presents evidence that wage effects vary markedly among those with degrees depending on their specific skill sets, and that globalisation can often benefit workers
without degrees.

Fuelled by concerns over rising income inequality, Occupy Wall Street has grown into a global movement in slightly over 2 months, with protests i over 900 cities worldwide. Protestors have been criticised for lacking a specific set of policy demands, but in this the protestors are hardly alone.

Continue reading Globalisation and higher education: Different degrees of success. (Offshoring, inequality, and the value of college degrees)