Tag Archives: financial viability

THE DYNAMIC BUSINESS PLANNING MODEL


Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor, www.BusinessThinker.com and former founder and CEO of JPIndustries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial group.

 

For CV details go to:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnpsarouthakis/

A Dynamic Business Planning Model is a model of organization effectiveness based on both the classical goal approach and open systems theory ideas pioneered by researchers at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, including Robert Katz, Robert Kahn, and Basil Georgopoulos. See reference book at the end of this article.

Borrowing from the classical goal approach, for-profit firms depend upon financial viability to survive.

A financially viable company can pay its bills when they are due and operates at a profit.

Simple enough. But achieving financial viability is much more complicated than merely determining objectives for profit and production of goods and then setting out to achieve those goals. This Model defines the issues you must manage to assure financial viability, including market strategy, work flow, resource acquisition, human relations, resource allocation, public relations, and technical mastery. Successful corporate strategy must tackle each of these issues.

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NO CHARACTER, NO CULTURE

Mr. Joseph P Garske is a retired private investor. He is an invited contributing writer to the www.BusinessThinker.com
He holds a bachelor degree in history from Harvard.

The title of this brief essay, “No Character, No Culture,” is of course an overstatement of the prevailing atmosphere in American life today. However, there are many Americans from all age groups, all economic and educational strata who would agree there is much truth in it.

In fact, it is likely that many people, if probed beneath the outward confidence they project in everyday life, would agree: America, for whatever reason, is in decline. They might express this concern in moral or spiritual or religious terms. But the malady they refer to would be the same for each of them.

The symptoms of this decline are abundant and obvious. The obesity epidemic, the bloat of public and private debt, a corrosive dependency on mind altering drugs–both illicit and prescribed, an astonishing homicide and incarceration rate. America, after all, has a far higher percentage of its population in prisons than any other country in the world.

Even actions of the national government are reflective–and even precipitous–of this decline. It can be seen in the extent to which elected officials have become the captive of highly influential and well-funded interest groups. Decline is also apparent in the general tone of policy in both domestic and foreign matters.

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How do You Manage a Company to Grow?

What can you learn from other CEO’s facing the dual challenges of maintaining growth and profitability? What issues are you likely to face and how can you best resolve them?

Management for growth is a complex process with many variables. It requires many changes – and much flexibility – along the way. I can speak from personal experience in building J.P, Industries, Inc. in just ten years to a Fortune 500 industrial corporation. I also want to share with you the results of a research study conducted by Dr. L.(Hendrickson) Uhlaner, formerly with Eastern Michigan University, under my guidance on the question of growth management and published in a book. Borrowing from the classical goal approach, firms depend on financial viability to survive and grow. A financially viable firm can pay its bills when they are due and operate at a profit, simple enough. But achieving financial viability is much more complicated than merely determining objectives for profit and production of goods and services and then setting out to achieve these goals. We must define the issues that we must manage in order to assure financial viability – these include market strategy, work flow, resource acquisition, human relations, resource allocation, public relations, and technical mastery. Continue reading How do You Manage a Company to Grow?