Tag Archives: employment

Small Business Growth

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor

The Business Thinker. LLC Internet magazine and Founder and Managing Director of JP-Management Center, LLC.

A Lecture Given at Hillsdale College

some long time ago that I believe is relevant today

The subject was

Small Business Growth

I am pleased to be at Hillsdale College for many reasons not the least of which is that the subject of this talk seems particularly appropriate. I am concerned about the factors that lead to employment growth, something that should be of vital interest to every student. So often discussion about employment or business focuses on the largest companies. Yet I think that we have not looked at the relationship of company size to employment growth and value to the society as a whole. I’m sure you were all pleased to see that Money magazine ranked Hillsdale College  among U.S. colleges and universities as a best value. One can raise the question of whether Hillsdale College is a best value for its size or does its size make it a best value. This relationship of size to value is an important one that is often distorted by mythology and misperceptions.

“Small business is the economic backbone of the nation.” “Small businesses are the only ones that are creating jobs in our economy,” “The future belongs to the person working at home connected to the outside world with a modem, computer, fax machine and a cellular telephone.” If all this has a familiar sound to it, it should. The last few years have produced endless streams of prose about small business and the new economy. Most of it glorifying the role of small business. Yet, for all the discussion, the concept of small business is more of an ideological construct than an economic or analytic one. One could argue that the ideological pull of small business is not a new phenomenon but a cultural mainstay of American life.

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Instead of soaking the rich, create some new riches: an update

drjohn11a

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor.www.BusinessThinker.com.
Founder and Managing Director, www.jpmcenter.com

We all know that if we confiscate the entire 2017 earnings of the highest earners and sent it to Washington, you would solve almost nothing in Washington. Most of us, I hope, understand furthermore that pulling the One Percent’s wealth away from the capitalist funnel that feeds our economy would be worse than solving nothing; it would be a serious problem. This plan would, on the other hand, goad the very top layer of American wealth to do everything in its power to grow the economic pie.

I first thought of the plan applying to any person or entity with taxable income of $1 million a year or more. That was partly because a million dollars is certainly a nice income—but also because it’s an easy figure with which to work in sorting out numerical concepts. A $1-million cutoff would apply to an army of CEOs and business owners, but also to several battalions of quarterbacks, pitchers, power forwards, rock guitar players, actors, and media performers or executives. Applying the plan to the entire One Percent would cover any household making roughly $506,000 and up. Maybe the plan could be modified and applied effectively to affluent but somewhat lower pay grades. I don’t know. Economists and tax experts and actuaries and mathematicians who are whizzes with algorithms—lots of people need to have a go at fine-tuning and improving what I will call here “Economic Growth Corporations.”

These Economic Growth Corporations (EGCs) would not be think tanks, or advisory panels, or bureaucracies whose public benefit can be measured only via the most imaginative statistics. EGCs would be chartered to grow the economy in fact, not in theory and not as mere demonstration projects. EGCs would jumpstart our economic engine in ways numerous schemes, from “enterprise zones” to your town’s tax-abated industrial park, have never done.

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Job Prospects In Southeast Michigan Keep Growing – Unemployment At 16-Year Low

There’s good news for jobseekers; employers in southeast Michigan are hiring. From April through June, the region’s unemployment rate reached 3.8 percent—a low not seen since 2001. Yet, even with the number of job postings on an upward trend year-to-year, a stagnant labor force portends more workers will be needed to meet future employer demand in the region.

These latest findings and more are analyzed in the Q2 2017 labor market reports, compiled by the Workforce Intelligence Network for Southeast Michigan (WIN) for a 16-county area in southeast Michigan and other regions.

For the complete article please go to  http://bit.ly/2zde2sk