Tag Archives: employment

Dumbed-Down Politics has Forced us on a Path that We Can Lose the Economic War!


Dr. John Psarouthakis
, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com, Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation, Adjunct Professor(ret.), Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

With ideological shouters exhorting the citizenry toward one precipice on the left and another on the right, a polarized America seems poised for a rocky demise, probably in answer to a Last Days tweet. Worse, this critical mass appears sufficient to drag us all down. The debt bomb and the entitlement bomb, to say nothing of other bombs, wait for no man. Depending which true-believer cliff one leans toward, America is descending into either a communal hell of withering fortune and lost freedoms, or an eternal blue flame of capitalist greed. If you find the shouters outrageously out of touch (not in their Doomsday forecasts, but in their self-fulfilling gridlock), you obviously are not alone. So where can a reader turn to find a compelling centrist message for our generation, or even a little book of bull’s-eye polemic? Where is Frank Capra when you need him, someone who can make us believe in the American Dream even as the 21st Century limps on.

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Greece: Labor Market reforms and their impact on economic development.

gogas

 

Dr. Periklis Gogas, Associate Professor and

Mitrakoulis

 

Mr. Panagiotis Mitrakoulis,

 

Senior Economics Student, Department of Economics
Democritus University of Thrace, Greece

Greece’s debt crisis, that started in 2010, is the longest and most severe in the country’s modern economic history. Since 2010, when Georgios Papandreou as the prime minister signed the first memorandum of understanding (MoU), Greece implements important fiscal adjustment measures combined with structural reforms.

Fiscal adjustment clauses aim to achieve balanced government budgets or primary surpluses that will help reduce the debt to GDP ratio. The complimentary, in the MoU, structural reforms are designed to increase productivity and international competitiveness. It will be very interesting to justify how labor market reforms, which are among the most painful and spark more public debates in Greece, bring the economy back to the road of development.

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Restoring Liberty To The States

Meltzer 3Dr. Allan H. Meltzer is an American Economist and the Allan H. Meltzer professor of Political Economy at Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business. He is the author of a large number of academic papers and books on monetary policy and the Federal Resrve Bank. Dr. Meltzer’s two volume books, “A History of the Federal Reserve”, are considered the most comprehensive history of the central bank.   He is considered one of the world’s foremost experts on the development and application of monetary policy. Currently he is also President of the Mont Pelerin Society. Dr. Meltzer originated the aphorism “Capitalism without failure is like religion without sin. It doesn’t work.”

This is a monthly column written by Professor Meltzer for Defining Ideas of the Hoover Institution.

It is posted in   http://www.hoover.org/research/

Our Constitution is explicit about who makes laws. Article 1 says: “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress.” One might think that the clause could not be misinterpreted or ignored, but it has been. An overwhelming number of federal laws are now made by administrative agencies under the executive branch. Our Constitution provides a government of checks and balances to protect citizens against tyranny, but these agencies are not subject to those checks and balances and they run roughshod over our liberty.

They pass their own rules and enforce the rules they make. In the event of challenge, they adjudicate the matter and issue judgments. Complaints can be heard in the regular court system, but that is a slow process. An outrageous example was a decision that closed a major accounting firm—Arthur Andersen—in 2003. By the time, the courts decided that the administrative decision was wrong, the Arthur Andersen personnel had scattered and the offices had closed. That is one well-known example but there are many others.

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