Tag Archives: Economics in Brief

What is the real cost of the Greek crisis?


Dr. Periklis Gogas
Associate Professor

 

 

Nancy Dimitriadou
MBA
 Student

 

Department of Economics, Democritus University of Thrace
Greece

The Greek debt crisis led to an unprecedented reduction in the country’s real GDP by 26.5%. This recession is one of the largest crises that the world economy has ever seen. For comparison, the Great Depression in the US in the later 1920’s resulted in a GDP reduction between 25% to 30%. Moreover, the Great Depression lasted for four years, while the Greek crisis reaches almost 8.

Simply stating that Greeks lost 26.5% of their income paints a gruesome picture. The true impact of the crisis is even worse. We compare current Greek real GDP to the one in 2009 just before the crisis. By doing so we are not taking into account a very significant stylized fact of every economy: growth. All economies show a strong positive trend in their GDP time series. This is the result of a steady growth in the factors of production, i.e. human and physical capital. The available human-working-hours increase due to population growth and the amount of physical capital stock also increases over time as a result of investment in fixed capital. Last but certainly not least, an additional very important factor for continuous growth is the improvement in technology. Technology significantly increases the productivity of both human and physical capital.

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What Jobs, Jobs, Jobs Really Means in the 21st Century

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor, www.BusinessThinker.com and former founder and CEO of JPIndustries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial group.

 

For CV details go to:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnpsarouthakis/

The preface in my book “Technology Imperative: What Jobs, Jobs, Jobs Really Means in the 21st Century”

My editor and I sat over coffee discussing several possible book projects.  If pressed for a working title that day, I might have tried to jam in as much content as possible to describe the concept—something like Technology, Unemployment, Globalization and What America Must Do to Regain Prosperity, Bring Its Economy Back to Life, and Survive in the New Century. That mouthful sums up the plot (if a non-fiction commentary can be described as having a plot) I had in mind.

In truth, every time I began to explain it I became distracted by the subplot   That is, these “must do” priorities for confronting and conquering an impending national crisis have failed to capture the public imagination despite dire consequences if we fail. Our politicians seem not to understand what is happening. Some ignore the clear facts, while others bark and circle like sheep dogs herding the populace toward the worst possible outcome. The daily mainstream news report has done little to help. I thought I was conveying frustration as I discussed these things, but my editor saw more and offered his own brief working title. “For the moment,” he said, “I am going to call this your ‘Angry Book’.”

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Do you know what Neoliberalism is?

Periklis

Dr. Periklis Gogas, Associate Professor, Department of International Economics, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece.

Agrapetidou
Ms. Anna Agrapetidou, PhD
candidate, Economics, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece

Neoliberalism is a term that can be traced back to the 1930’s. It was introduced then by the people who were looking for the middle way between the classical liberalism of the laissez-faire doctrine and the emerging –at that period- socialism. The usage of the term declined in the 1960’s and it was reintroduced in the 1980’s. This time, it was mainly used to describe the classical liberalism by its critics, thus adding negative connotations as its meaning was shifted to the laissez-faire principles.

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