Category Archives: Technology

Quantum Computers Are Coming. The World Might Not Be Ready

Bloomberg View published this article on September 6, 2016
The Editorial Board, Bloomberg.
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Quantum mechanics, Carl Sagan once observed, is so strange that “common sense is almost useless in approaching it.” Scientists still don’t understand exactly why matter behaves as it does at the quantum level. Yet they’re getting better at exploiting its peculiar dynamics — in ways that may soon upend the technology business.

One of the most interesting applications is in computing. In theory, quantum computers could take advantage of odd subatomic interactions to solve certain problems far faster than a conventional machine could. Although a full-scale quantum computer is still years off, scientists have lately made a lot of progress on the materials, designs and methods needed to make one.

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THE NEW UNIVERSITY SUB-CULTURE, a brief Op-Ed

JP-pic 2Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor, The Business Thinker; Founder and former CEO JPIndustries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation. CV Click here

The changes in culture, markets, and technologies experienced by manufacturing has had a rippling effect into to those institutions charged by societies with the integration of new knowledge.  

As we move on further into the 21st century, if we look closely at our university systems we will see that they have, in effect, “reinvented” themselves. Universities are  coming to terms in a very proactive sense, with the whole problem of technology change, technology transfer, and the rapid commercialization of technology into useful products and processes.

One way in which this is manifesting itself is the ever increasing exchanges of money, people, and ideas between the university and the industrial sector.

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In 5 years, the Midwest will have more startups than Silicon Valley

Shared from From Venture Beat (VB)
chris-olsenBy Chris Olsen the cofounder and general partner at Drive Capital.

Four years ago, I was a partner at Sequoia Capital, where Drew Houston, Brian Chesky, and a daunting parade of dent-making founders routinely proved that disruption happens in Silicon Valley like nowhere else. But things were changing, and fast.

We saw cloud access to cutting-edge technology sprout fast-growing companies in geographies far away from our epicenter. We, in fact, came to believe (as I still do today) that while the majority of the value in technology was built in Silicon Valley over the last 15 years, a disproportionate amount of the returns over the next 15 will be built elsewhere.

At Sequoia, we took to running around the world, opening offices and funds in India and China. We were investing in Sweden, Brazil, and Scotland. We were, by the way, the firm that was at one time known for only investing within a bicycle’s ride of Menlo Park.

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