Category Archives: Technology

A Manufacturing Renaissance; Is the Tech/Software Boom Over?

David ColeDr. David Cole is the Chairman of AutoHarvest (autoharvest.org), a web based tool to accelerate innovation in the auto industry. Dr. Cole is Chairman Emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research and a former Professor of Engineering at the University of Michigan where he taught courses related to the automotive field for over 25 years. He is a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers, Engineering Society of Detroit and Society of Manufacturing Engineers and was recently elected to the Automotive Hall of Fame.

We are in a period of amazing, almost transformational change like we have never witnessed before and all indications point to the pace quickening as we move forward from today. Clearly one dimension of this dynamic period is the incredible rate of change in technology that surrounds us from cars and housing to personal communication and healthcare.

For the past several decades the growth in technology is particularly evident in electronics with the control of just about everything shifting to electronic chips and their embedded software. These include cell phones and their multiple apps, the tools we use to design and manufacture goods of all forms, modern agricultural tools that enable farmers to optimize their business and the multitude of electronic items that pervade our lives.

It has been a great run and we have celebrated the enormous success of companies like Apple, Dell, Microsoft and Intel with very high evaluations and significant wealth creation for all involved. A new and really quite profound emerging question is what’s next? I’m not suggesting that these important companies will disappear nor will the technology they have developed but what they have produced and continue to produce may be becoming more of a commodity where the low cost provider wins. Many have seen significant declines in their value in the past several years. Have they peaked and, if so, what’s next?

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Robots v experts: are any human professions safe from automation?

Editor’s note: Given the intense discussion on the employment issues generated by the Robotics technology, I found this book presentation published by British www.theguardian.com very relevant and I am refering to it here.

By

Richard Susskind OBE is an author, speaker, and independent adviser to international professional firms and national governments. He is president of the Society for Computers and law IT adviser to the lord chief justice. Tomorrow’s Lawyers is his eighth book,

and

Daniel Susskind is an economist, lecturer at Balliol College, Oxford, and co-author with Richard Susskind of The Future of the Professions

The main themes of our book, The Future of the Professions, can be put simply: machines are becoming increasingly capable and so are taking on more and more tasks.

Many of these tasks were once the exclusive preserve of human professionals such as doctors, lawyers and accountants. While new tasks will certainly emerge in years to come, it is probable that machines will, over time, take on many of these as well. In the 2020s, we say, this will not mean unemployment, but rather a need for widespread retraining and redeployment. In the long run though, we find it hard to avoid the conclusion that there will be a steady decline in the need for traditional professional workers.

During the year after the book’s hardback publication in October 2015, we tested this line of argument on audiences of professionals in more than 20 countries, speaking to around 15,000 people at over 100 events. The response, frankly, was mixed. Our work seems to polarise people into those who agree zealously with our thesis, and those who reject it unreservedly. Both sides argue their views passionately.

For the entire article please click

Terrified of AI? Don’t Be, It May Be The Key to Tomorrow’s Survival

Tom Koulopoulos is the author of 10 books and founder of the Delphi Group, a 25-year-old Boston-based think tank and a past Inc. 500 company that focuses on innovation and the future of business.
We are drawn to doomsday scenarios. It’s in our nature. In many ways the history of civilization has been one of fearing and resisting the same technological advances that somehow help us beat the odds and propel us to the next level of progress. AI is no different.
Still, trying to separate the hyperbole from the facts is not always easy.
For the full article in Inc. please go to:   http://on.inc.com/2hKRZ4g