Category Archives: Shared Articles

How the Markets Responded to Trump

Why They Stayed Calm and Carried On

sumner_scott_600x900By SCOTT SUMNER who is Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and Professor of Economics at Bentley University. Follow him at the TheMoneyIllusion.com.

This article was published in Foreign Affairs on November 13, 2016.
To read the entire article please go to: http://fam.ag/2fSMsCE

World financial markets have had an unusual reaction to the unexpected U.S. presidential election victory of Donald Trump: they remained relatively calm and, some might say, even responded positively. Unlike the British pound after the Brexit vote, which tumbled rapidly shortly after, the U.S. dollar, after Trump’s election, actually strengthened modestly against foreign currencies such as the yen, the euro, and the yuan. Interest rates in the U.S. treasury bond market have increased, in both nominal and real terms. Inflation is also expected to increase modestly.

The reaction of global equity markets was perhaps the most surprising of all. U.S. stock futures fell as much as five percent on Tuesday evening, as it became apparent that Trump had all but secured a victory. The behavior was consistent with the pre-election pattern. Whenever polls showed an increased chance of a Trump win, stocks tended to dip (as they did following reports that FBI Director James Comey would be reopening an investigation into Secretary Hillary Clinton’s emails). But a few hours after Tuesday’s decline, stocks beat expectations and crept back up. By the end of the next trading day, the market was above pre-election levels.

Continue reading



6 Powerful Benefits of Quitting Your Job and Becoming an Entrepreneur

From FOX Business,   October 12, 2016

screen-shot-2014-04-28-at-5-09-54-pmBy Brandon Turner, an entrepreneur, real estate investor, author, youth leader.

FOR THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE Click on http://bit.ly/2e4TXGG

Today is the day I’m going to die was the thought permeating every crevasse of my mind on that warm Hawaiian afternoon last February. You see, I had just jumped awkwardly out of a plane and was hurling toward the ground at 120 miles per hour.

Luckily for me, the parachute opened just fine, and I coasted safely to the ground. I was alive, and the thrill was worth every penny.

Entrepreneurship feels oddly similar. Quitting your job and jumping into entrepreneurship is a lot like jumping out of a plane and free-falling, wondering whether the parachute will open to save you. It’s a scary thing, leaving the comfort of a 9-to-5 job and venturing into the world of entrepreneurship — so scary that very few ever overcome the fear enough to take the plunge.

Continue reading



An ancient Greek algorithm could reveal all-new prime numbers

sieveoferatosthenes_web_1024

FIONA MACDONALD is a Journalist and digital media specialist with 10 years experience across print and online media.
Looks after content strategy and partnerships for ScienceAlert.com, and occasionally freelances when she should be sleeping.
Her writing has appeared in GQ, Elle, Marie Claire, Popular Science, and Australian Geographic.

In Science Alert, 28 SEP 2016

In case you missed it, mathematicians are pretty obsessed with prime numbers – the limitless ‘atoms’ of the mathematical world that are only divisible by themselves and one.

People are so into them, in fact, that there’s a continual push (and even financial incentive) to compute larger and larger new prime numbers.

But one of the world’s top mathematicians thinks the key to taking things to the next level could come from an ancient Greek algorithm, called the sieve of Eratosthenes.

The sieve of Eratosthenes is pretty much what it sounds like – a mathematical sieve that helps people filter out prime numbers.

Developed by Eratosthenes of Cyrene, a Greek mathematician and astronomer (and former director of the famed Library of Alexandria) back in around 240 BC, the sieve allows people to determine all the primes between a certain set of numbers.

It works by having you write all the numbers out (say 1 to 100) and then you start crossing numbers off in a particular order – the multiples of 2 (other than 2) are first to go, then the multiples of 3, etc. starting from the next number that hadn’t been crossed out.

Continue reading