Category Archives: Management

THE BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND TODAY’S SOCIETY “Article 2”

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com,  publisher of www.GavdosPress.com and Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation.
For details go to: http://linkd.in/1AF7El7

We have been in the midst of a fundamental and historic shift of how the economies around the world develop.  With the collapse of communism, the centralized and state control model of the economy has also collapsed. Other socialist State models, i.e., Sweden, UK before Margaret Thatcher, have also collapsed.  What we have now, however, imperfect it maybe, is the model of the “Free Market.”

This shift is occurring in parallel with two other sociopolitical expressions:

  1. Smaller government, though the last couple years this seems to have moderated quite a bit, and
  2. the need, indeed the demand by our society to provide assistance, protection, and distribution of economic benefits a “fair” way

What we are witnessing is a major shift on “how we can fulfill our expectations of a humanistic society” while we keep the state’s interventions and control power at minimum.

Before I deal with this question (shift) let me digress in to a bit of history .  .  .  .  After all, how can a Greek get up to talk about such matters without referring to HISTORY .

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The Paradigm-Model of Corporate Culture

 

 

Dr, Theodore Scaltsas is professor of Philosophy,  University of Edinburgh



 

Mr Owen Kelly, OBE, Director of Engagement, Business School

 

 

 

Ms Shannon Chen, Postgraduate Researcher, Philosophy

 

 

University of Edinburgh, Scoltland

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Everybody wants to put more accountability into business; but this seems much easier said than done. For example, David Rock summarizes three different attempts to introduce values in corporate personnel behavior, and laments their lack of success by attributing the shortcomings to the innate complexity, if not irrationality, of human decision making (‘The Business of Values’). We take a more upbeat stance on human nature here, believing that society and its institutions can be guided by values – there is ample evidence of this among developing and developed cultures, and we do not think there is anything making us unfit for it.

Is, then, our current, less-than-ethical corporate behaviour a riddle that defies explanation? If we are capable of value-guided behaviour, why don’t we practice it in corporate environments? We believe there is an explanation for this. Personal and social values are built into our character, as Aristotle explained; they are acquired by training and habituation in early age, and exhibit themselves in our dispositions to feel, to decide, and to act in accordance with them. This is what Binta Niambi Brown discovered, when she felt impelled to disclose to her client crucial information that emerged just as the deal was being struck; “Even if the deal had been blown up for good, honest reasons rooted in decent integrity and morality” disposed her to reveal the information.

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Greek NPL’s: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?

Dr. Periklis Gogas Associate Professor

 

Dimitrios Karagiozis

Ph.D. Candidate

Department of Economics Democritus University of Thrace, Greece

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The year 2018 is a milestone for Greece, as it moves towards to the completion of the third economic adjustment program. That means that after the official end of the program in August 2018, Greece must take fate into its own hands, and try to borrow from the markets to meet its future debt obligations. As the country leaves behind the 8-year long memorandum era, the two main concerns for the Greek government and the banking sector are: a) a decision on the debt relief measures that should follow and b) a solution to the Non-Performing Loans (NPL’s) problem.

The International Monetary Fund openly declares what anyone with basic training in economics can see: Greece requires substantial debt relief from its European partners to restore debt sustainability. The main issue here is that the resolution of this problem mainly depends on political decisions from Greece’s EU partners that are hard to sell to their voters-tax payers. This is of outmost importance for the medium to long term stability of the Greek economy. On the other hand, the NPL’s problem is urgent and imperative.

Continue reading Greek NPL’s: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?