Category Archives: How To… articles

A variety of articles describing processes on “How To Do” and accomplish somethuing of value.

THE DYNAMIC BUSINESS PLANNING MODEL


Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor, www.BusinessThinker.com and former founder and CEO of JPIndustries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial group.

 

For CV details go to:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnpsarouthakis/

A Dynamic Business Planning Model is a model of organization effectiveness based on both the classical goal approach and open systems theory ideas pioneered by researchers at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, including Robert Katz, Robert Kahn, and Basil Georgopoulos. See reference book at the end of this article.

Borrowing from the classical goal approach, for-profit firms depend upon financial viability to survive.

A financially viable company can pay its bills when they are due and operates at a profit.

Simple enough. But achieving financial viability is much more complicated than merely determining objectives for profit and production of goods and then setting out to achieve those goals. This Model defines the issues you must manage to assure financial viability, including market strategy, work flow, resource acquisition, human relations, resource allocation, public relations, and technical mastery. Successful corporate strategy must tackle each of these issues.

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VALUING AND PRICING THE COMPANY (Re-posted)

Dr. John Psarouthakis, Founder and former CEO, JPIndusries,Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation. Publisher of www.BusinessThinker.com

Before you can begin final negotiations on price, you need to determine the value of the company. You can use several techniques to value a company.  We recommend the discounted cash flow value approach as the most accurate method although other approaches are useful in preliminary stages of your search to give you a sense of the range of the estimated price.

Timing and Scope of the Valuation Process

An initial calculation of valuation can be done on a fairly mechanical basis, based on information provided to you by the seller using established formulae and guidelines.  However, determining the accuracy of the financial data that the seller provides you is an on-going part of the evaluation process that should take place throughout preliminary and formal due diligence up to the closing.  Thus valuation takes place along with negotiations throughout the deal-making process.  One of the key objectives of due diligence is to surface any information that might affect the accurate valuation of the company. If your team does not have a financial auditor you should hire one to verify the accuracy of the historical data.

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Business Strategy, Decisive Management, and Success, reposted

Business Strategy, Decisive Management, and Success

An Article Written for the Euro-Horizon Magazine

By Dr. John Psarouthakis

Founder and President, JPManagementCenter, llc

Adj. Professor of Business Administration (ret.), School of Business, University of Michigan, and   Sr. Lecturer (ret.), Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Founder and former CEO, JPIndustries,Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial Group.

Plato, many centuries ago, said, “Nothing endures but change itself”. What is different in our era is not the presence of change but its pace–the rapidity with which ideas arise, are developed and applied, and the immediacy and degree of their impact in our lives. Let me illustrate.

When I were a student at MIT in the ‘50’s, it used to take five to ten years for an idea, or research result from a University, to become reality in the market and in our lives. Today it is almost simultaneous! This drastic change   has fundamentally altered how we manage business and how the universities relate to the society at large and to the economic development demands more specifically. In the long past corporate strategists could rely on the likelihood that things would not change for a relatively long time. Long term periods were identified as ten year long, while a short tem was a three year time. Today these expectations are tossed out of the window. There is no “static” period to plan within. Things are ever changing. We live in a time phase when strategies must be dynamic, flexible and responsive to the ever changing conditions around us.

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