Category Archives: How To… articles

A variety of articles describing processes on “How To Do” and accomplish somethuing of value.

WHO BUYS COMPANIES AND WHY

If you are buying a business for the first time, you will find that buying a business is a unique experience that requires extensive knowledge and skills in a broad spectrum of areas–legal, accounting, banking, financing, understanding of government regulations, especially in areas of environment, safety and employee relations.  You must learn how to obtain and screen leads, how to evaluate and price prospective companies, and how to conduct due diligence. But even highly experienced entrepreneurs who have completed dozens of deals still rely upon professional expertise for certain phases of the process.  Thus expect that even after you learn more about the deal-making process, you will still need to hire consultants to assist you in making a successful purchase.

Buying a company is very demanding because it is an intellectual, pragmatic and emotional process, all in one. It is an intellectual process because to be successful you have to think it out.  It is a pragmatic process because you have to be realistic about the company you are looking to buy, whether it is worth buying, what its real value is, and what it should be priced at. And buying a company, finally, is an emotional process.  Throughout negotiations, beginning with first contact with the seller and continuing through to the closing of the sale, you experience tremendous highs and lows. You must be able to handle both extremes of emotion. You must handle the highs, so as not to reveal your enthusiasm to the seller, and after the lows, to be able to come back and find a solution to the problem that might otherwise kill the deal.  The emotional component holds true even after many deals but you do learn to control those emotions with practice.

Reasons for Buying Your Own Business

Some of the reasons for buying your own business are similar to those of any entrepreneur: to control your own destiny; the personal challenge, making money, the satisfaction of building and running something on your own. Continue reading WHO BUYS COMPANIES AND WHY

These 15 charts illustrate the current U.S. private equity landscape

From PitchBook on July 19, 2017

Being honest, our 2Q 2016 U.S. PE Breakdown is the best thing you can read to catch up on the latest private equity trends in dealmaking, debt usage, EBITDA multiples, exit activity, fundraising and more. It’s completely free and you can access it here.

If you’d rather look over the highlights, we’ve featured the top charts from the report below:

U.S. PE activity by quarter

2Q has brought activity back to the trends we previously anticipated, with both aggregate deal value and volume sliding. Overall volume has returned to 2013 levels.

For the entire article and remaining very informative charts please go to:     http://bit.ly/29YuEqW

THE DYNAMIC BUSINESS PLANNING MODEL


Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor, www.BusinessThinker.com and former founder and CEO of JPIndustries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial group.

 

For CV details go to:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnpsarouthakis/

A Dynamic Business Planning Model is a model of organization effectiveness based on both the classical goal approach and open systems theory ideas pioneered by researchers at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, including Robert Katz, Robert Kahn, and Basil Georgopoulos. See reference book at the end of this article.

Borrowing from the classical goal approach, for-profit firms depend upon financial viability to survive.

A financially viable company can pay its bills when they are due and operates at a profit.

Simple enough. But achieving financial viability is much more complicated than merely determining objectives for profit and production of goods and then setting out to achieve those goals. This Model defines the issues you must manage to assure financial viability, including market strategy, work flow, resource acquisition, human relations, resource allocation, public relations, and technical mastery. Successful corporate strategy must tackle each of these issues.

Continue reading THE DYNAMIC BUSINESS PLANNING MODEL