Category Archives: Editorials

Editorials from the founder of The Business Thinker, Dr. John Psarouthakis, and invited writers

The Business Enterprise and Today’s Society


We have been in the midst of a fundamental and historic shift of how the economies around the world develop.  With the collapse of communism, the centralized and state control model of the economy has also collapsed. Other socialist State models, i.e., Sweden, UK before Margaret Thatcher, have also collapsed.  What we have now, however, imperfect it maybe, is the model of the “Free Market.”

This shift is occurring in parallel with two other sociopolitical expressions:

  1. Smaller government, though the last couple years this seems to have moderated quite a bit
  2. The need, indeed the demand by our society to provide assistance, protection, and distribution of economic benefits  a “fair” way

What we are witnessing is a major shift on “how we can fulfill our expectations of a humanistic society” while we keep the state’s interventions and control power at minimum. Continue reading



Welcome to the Business Thinker

Helping You With The Challenges of Business Management In An Incredibly Fast Paced Borderless Business World

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Dr. John Psarouthakis

Rapid change is an integral part of business life today. New management philosophies and tools are constantly being developed, while new technologies emerge at breathtaking speeds.

Today’s executives must constantly instill new vigor and flexibility into their enterprises in order to manage their companies forProfitably. To do this executives need instant and easy access to a full range of contemporary business management tools and models. Executives also need to develop skills in areas they would have never thought necessary just a few short years ago. Many things you learn today will be obsolete two years from now.

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Technology and Education

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The international economy of the future will depend more and more on the development and application of new technologies and on our educational system.

How well we convert new scientific knowledge into practical benefits will have much to say about the growth of nations, the rise of living standards, and the well-being of the global population that is estimated to double within the next fifty years.

Yet it seems that our policy-makers and our educational institutions and the constituents they service are allergic to the accelerating rate of progress.

Our political, and to some degree unfortunately, our educational systems are not yet equipped to anticipate and assimilate change. Continue reading