Category Archives: Business Strategy

Chinese Cultural Values

Dr. John Psarouthakis

Executive Editor

 

On the Power Distance dimension-Confucian Ethics

This is a short summary of a  report of research conducted by
JP Management Center, LLC.

Chinese society is seen by the Chinese as composed of people who are inherently unequal in rank and standing, and differences in rank are signaled and reinforced by the style of the interaction between the parties involved. As a visiting foreign business professional, you will be respected and shown deference, and in turn you will be expected to show deference and formality, especially in your relationships with Chinese who are superior in rank to you within their own organizations.

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Human Resources for Manufacturing of the Future

Dr. John Psarouthakis

Executive Editor

There is tendency on the part of too many manufacturing professionals, as well as manufacturing scholars, to look at the enterprise as a simple combination of capital, management, and labor, while usually looking at labor as some commodity that can be bought and sold, easily obtained, and of little concern for our immediate or long-term future. Such an assumption is a grave error given the current and foreseeable human resources of U.S. manufacturing. There are several aspects to this general problem. One is the training and skills level of the existing workforce.

Conducting a survey of manufacturing employees as to what they need to do a better job the response invariably is: training of technical staff, operators, and supervisors.

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The Development and Deployment of Technology


Dr. John Psarouthakis

Executive Editor

Technology development and deployment are important because manufacturing has become a technologically-driven endeavor. Our ability to compete in manufacturing is dependent upon the quality and the sophistication of our human resources, manufacturing facilities and equipment. In the recent past, we allowed our manufacturing equipment and facilities to deteriorate relative to our foreign competitors.

It is indeed a bitter pill to swallow that the U.S. was failing in the development and commercialization of new manufacturing technologies. As the recent Nobel Prize awards attest, our scientific base is still unparalleled in the world. We have the support of the Federal government and the strength and vitality of universities to thank for this state of affairs. We also have a strong and vital network of federal labs and a distinguished groups of not-for-profit R&D facilities contributing to the nations store of knowledge. Even with this scientific base, however, we have not learned to master yet the” art of knowledge utilization and technology transfer. In effect, the scientific knowledge produced by our universities and labs has benefited other nations, at least as much, and arguably more, than it has helped us in the recent past but it seems to be correcting.

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