1 in 3 Companies Constrained by Corruption

jim-kimBy Dr. JimYong KimM.D., Ph.D. is the President of the World Bank Group. Soon after he became president in July 2012, the organization established two goals: ending extreme poverty by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity for the bottom 40 percent of the population in developing countries. Kim’s career has been focused on health, education, and delivering services to the poor.

Approximately one in three companies around the world identify corruption as a major constraint to operating their business. We can and must do much more to combat corruption. It poses an enormous obstacle to the global goal of ending extreme poverty, denying resources to the poor and undermining the delivery of services to the vulnerable. 

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Greater Inequality Not Due To New Technology And Free Trade

scoccoBy Sandro Scocco is Chief Economist at the Stockholm-based think tank Arena Idé and has a background as the Chief Economist of the governmental research institute ITPS. He is also a former Director at the Labour Market Board and served during the 1990s as an adviser to several Swedish social democratic ministers.

From the Social Europe Journal, December 9, 2016

A popular narrative today is that low-income groups in the western world have fallen behind owing to jobs lost to new machines and to low-paid jobs overseas. Political populists like Trump or Le Pen have happily exploited this frustration with nostalgic, nationalistic and anti-free trade messages. A new study shows that this narrative has little support in historical trends.

Certainly, large groups have fallen behind in recent decades. But this is true not only of low-income groups but also of large parts of the middle class in many countries. Take, for example, those with higher education in the US; their real incomes have stagnated in the past 15 years. In the whole of the industrialised world median wage growth has fallen markedly behind GDP growth. By contrast, the top 1 percent have increased their income much faster than the rise in GDP and, in some countries, including the US and Sweden, they have more than doubled their income share.

So, there is a clear breeding ground for anger and frustration among broad groups, and not just among low-income earners, but is it really related to technology and trade?

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How to Determine What Type of Investor Is Right for Your Business

In Inc. Magazine
By Tim Chaves, founder and CEO of ZipBooks.

As founder of an accounting software startup, I’ve raised over $2 million in venture capital funding to get my company off the ground. And that’s not unique: If you’re selling goods, you need inventory; if you’re selling software, you have to build it. But doing that costs money — there’s usually some period of losses long before you begin to see profits. Someone has to be willing to take those losses, but who would be willing to throw money at a project that’s intentionally losing money?

For the entire article go to:

http://www.inc.com/young-entrepreneur-council/how-to-determine-what-type-of-investor-is-right-for-your- business.html