Actions Immediately after Closing the Acquisition Deal

drjohn11aBy Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com,  Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation

This is the 16th and last of a Series of  short articles on “HOW TO BUY THE RIGHT COMPANY”  that have been posted herein.

Once you close the deal, you need to be prepared to go in the very next morning to meet with your management team as well as your entire staff.

What you do in the first days and weeks will set the tone for your relationship with your employees for some time to come, possibly even the duration of your ownership.

Remember that the chief concerns of your employees and managers may be somewhat different than your own agenda. Employees will be concerned, first and foremost about their own job security and future with the company now that it is under new ownership.

Management shares this concern, and may also have more narrow issues facing them in their own departments, that nevertheless they may feel requires immediate attention.

An easy model to follow includes a short initial introductory meeting with management, an all-employee meeting to include all management and non-management staff, and then a third more formal meeting with management.

These meetings will set in motion the planning to carry out the three objectives of the transition: addressing your key constituencies (employees, customers, suppliers and bankers), revision of the action plan, and implementation of significant changes outlined in the plan.

Other meetings will follow in the first days and weeks, but it is essential to try to fit these first three meetings into the first day if at all possible.

As a new owner, you must be careful to listen carefully, building trust and goodwill with your new employees.

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Briefly Reviewing the Closing of the Acquisition Deal

JP Bio PhotoBy Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor of www.BusinessThinker.com,  Founder and former CEO, JP Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 industrial corporation

This is the 15th of a Series of  short articles on “HOW TO BUY THE RIGHT COMPANY” They will be posted at one a week

Here we briefly review the closing of the Acquisition deal. The key aspect of this step is the preparation and signing of the purchase agreement and other documents needed for closing.

Beyond the legal requirements of having a purchase agreement, the preparation of the document itself is an important aspect of the due diligence process. Because of the representations and warranties a seller is obligated to vouch for, frequently, problems surface during this period that you may not otherwise uncover. For this reason, it is very important to begin work on the purchase agreement as soon as the letter of intent is signed and you begin formal due diligence.

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How the Markets Responded to Trump

Why They Stayed Calm and Carried On

sumner_scott_600x900By SCOTT SUMNER who is Ralph G. Hawtrey Chair of Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and Professor of Economics at Bentley University. Follow him at the TheMoneyIllusion.com.

This article was published in Foreign Affairs on November 13, 2016.
To read the entire article please go to: http://fam.ag/2fSMsCE

World financial markets have had an unusual reaction to the unexpected U.S. presidential election victory of Donald Trump: they remained relatively calm and, some might say, even responded positively. Unlike the British pound after the Brexit vote, which tumbled rapidly shortly after, the U.S. dollar, after Trump’s election, actually strengthened modestly against foreign currencies such as the yen, the euro, and the yuan. Interest rates in the U.S. treasury bond market have increased, in both nominal and real terms. Inflation is also expected to increase modestly.

The reaction of global equity markets was perhaps the most surprising of all. U.S. stock futures fell as much as five percent on Tuesday evening, as it became apparent that Trump had all but secured a victory. The behavior was consistent with the pre-election pattern. Whenever polls showed an increased chance of a Trump win, stocks tended to dip (as they did following reports that FBI Director James Comey would be reopening an investigation into Secretary Hillary Clinton’s emails). But a few hours after Tuesday’s decline, stocks beat expectations and crept back up. By the end of the next trading day, the market was above pre-election levels.

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