The Network Always Wins, By Peter Hinssen, McGraw Hill 2015

JP-pic 2A book review by Dr. John Psarouthakis, Executive Editor, www.BusinessThinker.com

This book eloquently and effectively “talks’ about the complexity of our world today and particularly about the complex systems in Business. It is a fascinating read and amazingly effective in communicating the complexity and what to do about it. In one page Peter presents the thermodynamic property of Entropy and Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and being understood. That is an achievement in itself since Entropy is inter-wound with the second law of thermodynamics and the other with quantum mechanics! Not a simple achievement.

Though I believe complexity has existed for as long as humans began to deal in groups those early people and for many thousand of years they dealt with complexity with simple linearity approach

Because the complexity and the changes that came with it then occurred at a very slow pace and the linear approach was practical and effective. Today the change comes at a high acceleration rate that we do not have the time to deal with the gross deviations that linearity will require to deal with the issues at hand. Adding to this is the great interdependence of our activities on a global scale and instantly felt effects of actions occurring on the other side of the glob from us, etc.

This book, not only made me more acutely aware of the complex world we live in, but also provided me with approaches to the complexity so that I can deal with it and not fall in to “panic”!

I strongly recommend this book that deals with difficult concepts in a way that we build our confidence in dealing with the complexities of today’s business world.

Europe Rethinks the Schengen Agreement

G.Friedman
Mr. George Friedman
is the CEO and Chief Intelligence Officer of  Statfor, a private intelligence company located in Austin, Texas.

 

  • Forecast
    • Rising immigration and fragile economic recovery in Europe will reduce political support for the Schengen Agreement, which eliminates border controls among member states.
    • The Schengen Agreement will likely be reformed to make room for countries to tighten their border controls more frequently.
    • Friction between Schengen members and other countries will remain, as will tension within the bloc itself.

Analysis

When France, West Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg signed the Schengen Agreement in 1985, they envisioned a system in which people and goods could move from one country to another without barriers. This vision was largely realized: Since its implementation in 1995, the Schengen Agreement eliminated border controls between its signatories and created a common visa policy for 26 countries.

The treaty was a key step in the creation of a federal Europe. By eliminating border controls, member states gave up a basic element of national sovereignty. The agreement also required a significant degree of trust among its signatories, because it put the responsibility for checking foreigners’ identities and baggage on the country of first entry into the Schengen area. Once people have entered a Schengen country, they can move freely across most of Europe without facing any additional controls.

The Schengen Agreement was implemented in the 1990s, when the end of the Cold War and the prospect of permanent economic prosperity led EU members to give up national sovereignty in many sensitive areas. The creation of the eurozone is probably the most representative agreement of the period. But several things have changed in Europe since then, and member states are beginning to question many of the decisions that were made during the preceding years of optimism.

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